Articles
Companies

Home / NEWS / Kingdom Tower to minimise stack effect, says EDS

Kingdom Tower to minimise stack effect, says EDS

by Gavin Davids on Aug 27, 2011


ESD has been involved with the Kingdom Tower's design right from the beginning.
ESD has been involved with the Kingdom Tower's design right from the beginning.

RELATED ARTICLES: Kingdom Tower: ESD wins building systems contract | Burj Khalifa provides Kingdom Tower MEP template | Langan designs foundation for Kingdom Tower

RELATED ARTICLES: Kingdom Tower: ESD wins building systems contract | Burj Khalifa provides Kingdom Tower MEP template Langan designs foundation for Kingdom Tower

Environmental Systems Design (EDS), the MEP consultant for Jeddah’s 1km-tall Kingdom Tower, plays an integral role in ensuring that the projects is both energy-efficient and minimises potential problems such as stack effect.

Mehdi Jalayerian, the executive vice president of ESD, told MEP Middle East that the consultancy had played a major role in the planning and design stages of the building in order to ensure that the energy load is minimised.

“I think the big part of any design is the integration of all thought processes. We (ESD) truly believe that you don’t get efficiency only from HVAC systems, like most people may think. The big part of efficiency itself comes from the development itself, the configuration of the building, the organisation of it and how the building loads are envisioned for the project,” he explained.

With a three-legged footprint similar to that of the Burj Khalifa, the Kingdom Towers is designed and orientated in such a way that its façades align from north-east and north-west, thereby avoiding the harsh morning and afternoon sunlight.

“On the south façade, you have the solar directly overhead. It’s shining at a steep angle to the building, with minimised load. The shape (of the building) has a lot to do with reducing the environmental impact of the project,” said Jalayerian.

He added that the company had worked with the architectural team on the high-performance aspects of the façade itself, from wall design to glass performance, looking to reduce the solar gains from the project.

As part of its work to ensure optimum system performance, ESD also worked with the architects Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill and structural engineers Thornton Tomasetti on wind and airflow studies around the building to make sure they were not adversely influencing system operations.

“Tall buildings have a phenomenon known as stack effect. In a very cold climate, the stack effect is actually buoyancy of air that rises up in a building, creating pressure and bringing an unwanted and undesirable airflow into the building. In a very hot climate, that phenomenon is reversed.

“The air wants to come into the top of the building and then drop down and exhaust out of the base. So the configuration and orientation, also the space planning within it, needs to take all that into account to optimise. In our opinion, it’s really an integrated solution rather than a singular account,” explained Jalayerian.

The Kingdom Tower will also be designed to collect and funnel ‘condensate water’ from the building's air-conditioning systems, using them for irrigation and other purposes within the building, said Jalayerian, while adding that efficient water fixtures would also be installed and used on the project, thereby minimising water use.



Advertisement




Articles
Companies