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Home / NEWS / ASHRAE seeks comments on standard for moisture-affected areas

ASHRAE seeks comments on standard for moisture-affected areas

by Fatima De La Cerna on Nov 19, 2017


ASHRAE and IAQA have co-developed a standard for assessing moisture-affected areas in educational facilities [representational image].
ASHRAE and IAQA have co-developed a standard for assessing moisture-affected areas in educational facilities [representational image].

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ASHRAE has announced that it is seeking a second round of public comments on a standard it has jointly developed with the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA).

In a statement, ASHRAE said that Standard 3210P, or the Standard for the Assessment of Educational Facilities for Moisture Affected Areas and Fungal Contamination, is available on its website for public review until 25 December, 2017.

According to ASHRAE, the standard is intended “to provide a uniform and repeatable procedure specifically tailored to educational facilities, to identify areas in buildings, materials, equipment, and systems that are subject to moisture or are suspected of fungal contamination or adverse conditions associated with fungal contamination”.

Commenting on ASHRAE’s request for additional comments, Jay Stake, chair of the Standard 3210P committee, said: “Gaining input from the public on new ASHRAE standards is crucial towards improving the safety of education facilities.

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“The goal of SPC 3210P is to guide professionals through the proper assessment to obtain a healthy indoor environment for educational facilities and its occupants.”

Noting that moisture build-up in indoor environments can be controlled through proper building design, construction, and operation, ASHRAE emphasised the damage and microbial contamination caused by moisture can result in “billions of dollars in repair costs”.

The society clarified that the standard does not cover contamination beyond fungal growth.



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