Articles
Companies

Home / ANALYSIS / CW's 2017 Salary Survey sheds light on GCC construction job trends

CW's 2017 Salary Survey sheds light on GCC construction job trends

by James Morgan on Dec 2, 2017


Approximately 85% of respondents who intend to change jobs expect to remain in the GCC.
Approximately 85% of respondents who intend to change jobs expect to remain in the GCC.

RELATED ARTICLES: CW Salary Survey 2017: Are you working too hard? | CW Salary Survey 2017: Are you being paid on time? | CW Salary Survey 2017: Are you earning enough?

Approximately 2% of 2017’s respondents – the same proportion as last year – reported basic monthly earnings of less than $500. Conversely, whereas nobody who responded to CW’s 2016 Salary Survey reported a monthly wage of more than $40,000, seven fortunate individuals claimed to be earning in excess of $480,000 per annum this year.

Once again, air tickets home were the most common benefit among this year’s cohort (80%). Accommodation or accommodation allowance came in second place (72%), followed by a company car or car allowance (54%), commission or bonuses (34%), and school fees or schooling allowance (14%).

Wage stagnation within the GCC’s construction community appears not only to have persisted, but also increased among respondents to CW’s 2017 Salary Survey. The 2015 survey found that the salaries of 60% of respondents had either remained the same or fallen during the preceding 12-month period. Last year, this figure increased to 69% and, among this year’s respondents, it was 72%.

The proportion of participants who reported having received a pay cut during the previous 12 months witnessed a slight fall this year, with 3% seeing their wages reduced compared to 5.5% in 2016. Approximately 14% of this year’s respondents have received a pay rise due to promotion during the past year, with the same proportion receiving a cost-of-living pay rise.

Of those who have received salary increases in the past 12 months, the most common percentage rise was less than 0.5% (27%). Approximately 4% of this year’s participants have seen their salaries rise by more than 20% during the last year.

Of those whose salaries have fallen during the past 12 months, the most common percentage reduction was also less than 0.5% (51%). Almost 5% of this sub-section have suffered pay cuts in excess of 20%.

Wage-related optimism has witnessed a slight year-on-year increase. Almost half (48%) of respondents anticipate a pay rise within the next 12 months, compared with 44% of the 2016 cohort. However, it’s interesting to note that 71% of respondents to CW’s 2015 Salary Survey anticipated a pay rise within the proceeding 12 months, so it would be fair to conclude that salary expectations in the region remain muted.

Of those who do expect their wages to increase during the coming year, 22% anticipate a rise of between 5.1% to 10%. Approximately 6% of respondents anticipate a pay hike in excess of 20%.

Average working hours within the GCC’s construction community appear to have remained relatively stable, year on year. Once again, the most common category among this year’s respondents was an average working week of 46 to 50 hours (34%). In terms of outliers, 2% of the cohort claimed to be working in excess of 71 hours per week, while nobody reported average working weeks of less than 30 hours.

CW’s annual Salary Survey usually sheds light on trends that represent cause for concern, and the 2017 iteration is no exception. Although perhaps indicative of broader economic challenges, factors such as salary disruption and wage stagnation could pose serious problems for the GCC’s construction industry if left unchecked.

There are, however, several reasons to be cheerful. A year-on-year rise in overall job satisfaction, coupled with the fact that the majority of 2017’s respondents intend to remain in the GCC during the coming 12 months, suggest that construction firms can look forward to a period of relative stability when it comes to the regional workforce.

That this year’s responses so closely reflect those collected as part of CW’s 2016 Salary Survey may also give credence to this assessment.



Advertisement




Articles
Companies