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Kahramaa urges clients to become more energy savvy

In a drive to become more energy efficient, Kahramaa is urging its customers to replace tungsten lamps at home and in other buildings with energy-saving LED bulbs

In an effort to help reduce electricity consumption, Kahramaa is urging customers to replace tungsten lamps with energy-saving LED bulbs.
In an effort to help reduce electricity consumption, Kahramaa is urging customers to replace tungsten lamps with energy-saving LED bulbs.

Qatar General Electricity & Water Corporation (Kahramaa) is appealing to its customers to become more energy-saving savvy.

In an effort to help reduce electricity consumption, the authority is urging customers to replace tungsten lamps at home and in other buildings with energy-saving LED bulbs.

While highlighting in a statement that illumination accounts for between 10% and 15% of a building’s energy consumption, Kahramaa explained: “LED bulbs are 10 to 18 times [more] energy efficient than tungsten bulbs, and [reduce] electricity use by nearly 80%.”

In May 2016, a ban was placed on the import and sale of 75 watt and 100 watt tungsten bulbs. The law will be expanded to include 40 watt and 60 watt tungsten bulbs from 1 November 2016.

Kahramaa poited out: “LED bulbs of 7, 11, 20 and 23 watts could replace tungsten lamps of 25, 60, 100 and 120, respectively.”

The urge to switch to LED bulbs follows Kahramaa's Tarsheed campaign, a national programme designed to conserve energy and improve efficiency.

The programme was conducted in collaboration with Qatar's Ministry of Municipality and Environment.

Compared to tungsten bulbs, LED bulbs produce less heat and give off no harmful carbon emissions, making them friendlier to the environment.

An additional energy saving consideration was mooted to make better use of natural light and to reduce energy consumption by painting interior walls in light colours.

In 2015, Tarsheed’s law No 20 outlined that keeping a building’s external lights on between 7am and 4.30pm could incur a fine of $2,746 (QAR10,000).

In line with the adopted practices of Kahramaa, the law also stipulates the necessity of installing lighting timers in all buildings to control external lighting.

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