Kahramaa clamps down on energy and water wastage

As part of its drive to reduce water and energy consumption in Qatar, utility provider Kahramaa has increased inspections and guilty parties are being severely penalised and fined.

As part of its move to reduce water and energy consumption in Qatar, utility provider Kahramaa has increased inspections and guilty parties are being severely penalised and fined.
As part of its move to reduce water and energy consumption in Qatar, utility provider Kahramaa has increased inspections and guilty parties are being severely penalised and fined.

Utilities provider, Kahramaa has announced a clamp down on people who are guilty of wasting water and electricity.

The inspection drive is aimed at catching and fining those who flout Qatar’s water and electricity wastage rules, Doha News reported..

This month, on its Snapchat video account ‘Kahramaa.live’ Tarsheed inspectors were seen penalising a premises that had its outdoor lights burning during the day.

While Tarsheed, the conservation arm of Kahramaa has complained that it often lacks the legal clout to conduct inspections in homes and other locations, these inspections came as a surprise to many.

According to The Peninsula, Fahad Al Hanzab, head of the Legal Monitoring Unit at Tarsheed, said however, that some inspectors do have judicial powers.

“They visit the facilities to enforce the Tarsheed law. Law No. 20 of 2016 has banned using drinking water for washing vehicles, equipment and outer parts of homes with gushing hoses,” he said.

Part of the reason that, per capita, Qatar is among the world’s biggest consumers of water and electricity is because both are so heavily subsidised by the government.

While the cost of energy increased last year austerity measures too have become even more imperative.

In Qatar, it is illegal to keep external lights burning between 7am and 4pm, and to use running water from a hose on gardens or to wash cars.

Last year, Qatar doubled the maximum penalties for water and electricity wastage and as a result, residents who use drinking water for anything other than drinking, can be fined up to QAR20,000 (approx. $5,500).

In addition, both residents and owners of properties can be fined for water leakages caused by damaged pipes.

While it is not illegal to leave the lights on at night, doing so during the day can attract fines of up to QAR10,000 or about $2,750.

The country has set specific savings targets for water and power through 2018, aiming to reduce energy consumption per capita from 43KWh/day currently to 39KWh/day and to cut water usage from 595l/day to 459l/day.

Interestingly, earlier this year officials said that per capita, electricity use declined by 14% in the past three years, while water consumption fell by 17% between April 2012 and November 2015.
 

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