Smart meters in buildings may not cut energy use

Previously the device has been praised within the construction sector

In March, it was announced that as many as 500 villas in Abu Dhabi would have smart meters installed.
In March, it was announced that as many as 500 villas in Abu Dhabi would have smart meters installed.

Smart meters may not be effective in reducing energy within homes and offices, according to research published in the Building Research and Information Journal.

The findings of the study, completed by Sarah Darby, a scientist from the University of Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute, suggest that the revolutionary devices do not necessarily lower energy demand.

Specifically, the report referred to how smart meters could help users minimise their energy use only if they provided adequate feedback, which many did not, and if they were combined with other methods for curbing energy consumption.

Earlier this year, the Regulation and Supervision Bureau (RSB) in Abu Dhabi announced that as many as 500 villas in the capital would be fitted with smart meters in a scheme aimed at slashing peak electricity demands.

The benefits anticipated for the Middle East region included helping people realise how much power and water they consumed by turning real-time data into actionable information.

In the UK, the government plans to install smart meters in more than 27 million houses over the next ten years.

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